Bread Price Fixing

Bread Price Fixing

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Bread Price Fixing Overview

Revelations of the price-fixing of bread and related consumer products prompted this class action, headed by an anti-poverty activist in Elliot Lake, Ontario.

The class action alleges that the defendant grocery retailers and suppliers, which include Metro, Loblaws, Wal-Mart, Sobeys and Giant Tiger, conspired with each other to fix the price of bread and other packaged baked goods. Possibly affected brands include Wonder, Weston, Country Harvest, Dempster’s, Sunshine and Villaggio, among others.

The proposed class action includes all residents of Canada who purchased bread or other packaged baked goods from any food retailer, beginning January 1, 2001.

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Recours Collectif Relatif À La Fixation Du Prix Du Pain

Des révélations au sujet de la fixation des prix du pain et de produits de consommation reliés ont mené à ce recours collectif mené par un militant contre la pauvreté d’Elliot Lake, en Ontario

Selon le recours collectif, les détaillants et fournisseurs de produits d’épicerie qui sont les défendeurs, qui comprennent Metro, Loblaws, Wal-Mart, Sobeys et Tigre géant, ont conspiré entre eux pour fixer le prix du pain et d’autres produits boulangers emballés. Les marques potentiellement affectées comprennent entre autres Wonder, Weston, Country Harvest, Dempster’s, Sunshine et Villaggio.

Le recours collectif proposé inclut tous les résidents du Canada qui ont acheté du pain ou d’autres produits boulangers emballés de n’importe quel détaillant alimentaire depuis le 1er janvier 2001.

Bread Price Fixing Updates

  • January 29, 2018: The Ontario Superior Court of Justice is scheduled to hear a motion on February 21, 2018, to decide whether it should be Sotos LLP (in cooperation with Siskinds LLP) or Strosberg Sasso Sutts LLP that prosecute this case in Ontario.
  • January 9, 2018: As has been widely publicized in the media, Loblaws is offering $25 cards to the public following its admission that it engaged in illegal price fixing on the price of packaged bread sold to Canadians for approximately 14 years.  We have been contacted by many people who have asked whether they should obtain the $25 card and what effect this will have on their rights in the class action.  For the reasons set out below, we suggest that people wishing to obtain the Loblaws card should be aware that accepting the card may affect the amount that they may subsequently receive in the lawsuit, should it be successful, but will not prevent them from participating in the lawsuit.Loblaw’s website https://loblawcard.ca/ says that it is requiring customers to agree to releases in exchange for signing up for the $25 cards. The releases state that anyone who receives a card agrees that “twenty-five ($25) dollars will be deducted from any compensation that you may otherwise be entitled to receive in any class action judgment against, or settlement with, Loblaw relating to any overcharge.”On January 9th, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled on whether the releases are valid. The Court decided that it was too early to determine the issue. A court may conclude in the future that the releases are valid, or a court may conclude that Loblaws is not entitled to deduct $25 from compensation awarded in the class action (if any). A copy of the decision (in English) can be found here.
  • January 8, 2018: The Ontario Superior Court of Justice heard a motion today regarding whether accepting Loblaws’ $25 card means that class members’ damages in the class action will also be reduced by $25. We expect the Court to make a decision on the issue soon. We will provide an update when the decision is released. We are recommending that class members wait until the decision before deciding whether to register for the card. The deadline for registration specified on https://loblawcard.ca is May 8, 2018.
  • January 8, 2018: We are reviewing the terms of the Loblaw gift card program that were posted today.  We are aware that Loblaw has attached certain conditions to its $25 gift card program. We will be providing information in that regard shortly.
  • December 21, 2017: Class action launched in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice on behalf of Canadian Consumers.

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  • 29 janvier 2018 : La Cour supérieure de justice de l’Ontario doit entendre une requête le 21 février 2018 pour décider si ce devrait être Sotos LLP (en collaboration avec Siskinds LLP) ou Strosberg Sasso Sutts LLP qui intente cette action en Ontario.
  • 9 janvier 2018 : Comme les médias l’ont largement diffusé, Loblaws offre au public des cartes d’une valeur de 25 $ à la suite de son aveu qu’elle a pris part à une fixation illégale du prix du pain emballé vendu aux Canadiens pendant environ 14 ans. De nombreuses personnes ont communiqué avec nous pour savoir si elles devraient se procurer la carte de 25 $ et quel effet cela aurait sur leurs droits en vertu du recours collectif. Pour les raisons énoncées ci-dessous, nous suggérons que les gens qui souhaitent obtenir la carte de Loblaws devraient savoir qu’accepter la carte pourrait avoir un impact sur le montant qu’ils pourraient subséquemment recevoir dans le cadre de la poursuite, si celle-ci obtient gain de cause, mais ne préviendra pas leur participation au recours collectif. Selon le site de Loblaws, les clients doivent accepter une décharge en échange de leur inscription pour recevoir la carte de 25 $. Cette décharge stipule que quiconque reçoit une carte accepte ” qu’un montant de vingt-cinq (25) dollars sera déduit de toute indemnité que vous pourriez avoir le droit de recevoir en vertu d’un jugement rendu contre Loblaw dans une action collective ou d’un règlement conclu avec Loblaw portant sur la surfacturation. “ Le 9 janvier, la Cour supérieure de justice de l’Ontario a évalué la validité des décharges. La Cour a conclu qu’il était trop tôt pour trancher la question. Un tribunal pourrait conclure que les décharges sont valides, ou que Loblaws n’a pas le droit de déduire 25 $ de toute indemnité accordée dans le cadre du recours collectif (le cas échéant). On peut consulter la décision (en anglais) ici.
  • 8 janvier 2018 : La Cour supérieure de justice de l’Ontario a entendu une requête aujourd’hui quant à savoir si l’acceptation de la carte-cadeau de 25 $ de Loblaws signifie que les dommages-intérêts des membres du groupe en vertu du recours collectif seront également réduits de 25 $. Nous nous attendons à ce que la Cour rende une décision à ce sujet bientôt. Nous fournirons une mise à jour lorsque la décision sera rendue. Nous recommandons aux membres du groupe d’attendre la décision avant de décider de s’inscrire pour obtenir la carte. La date limite pour s’inscrire qui est précisée sur https://loblawcard.ca est le 8 mai 2018.

Bread Price Fixing News

Frequently Asked Questions

As has been widely publicized in the media, Loblaws is offering $25 cards to the public following its admission that it engaged in illegal price fixing on the price of packaged bread sold to Canadians for approximately 14 years. We have been contacted by many people who have asked whether they should obtain the $25 card and what effect this will have on their rights in the class action. For the reasons set out below, we suggest that people wishing to obtain the Loblaws card should be aware that accepting the card may affect the amount that they may subsequently receive in the lawsuit, should it be successful, but will not prevent them from participating in the lawsuit.

Loblaw’s website LoblawCard.ca says that it is requiring customers to agree to releases in exchange for signing up for the $25 cards. The releases state that anyone who receives a card agrees that “twenty-five ($25) dollars will be deducted from any compensation that you may otherwise be entitled to receive in any class action judgment against, or settlement with, Loblaw relating to any overcharge.”

On January 9th, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled on whether the releases are valid. The Court decided that it was too early to determine the issue. A court may conclude in the future that the releases are valid, or a court may conclude that Loblaws is not entitled to deduct $25 from compensation awarded in the class action (if any). A copy of the decision (in English) can be found here.

No. Every Canadian who purchased packaged bread from 2001-2017 is automatically a member of the class unless they take steps at a later date to exclude themselves from the class action. Persons who do not wish to be a part of the class action can choose to opt-out after the case is certified as a class action.

However, if you wish to register on our website here, you will receive periodic e-mail updates about the class action.

Also, if you use Facebook, please like and follow our Facebook page where we post updates on the case.

The class action covers all provinces and territories in Canada. You are automatically a part of the class action if you bought fresh commercial bread. There is no need to register to be a part of the class action.

We understand that seven different cases have been commenced in Canada. You do not need to join them to be a part. At some point in the future, a court will decide which case(s) will proceed. Please register on our website for updates.

The case is at a very early stage. We cannot accurately estimate damages at this point.

We cannot definitively answer this question at this early stage of the litigation. However, if you have kept receipts for the bread products that you purchased, please retain them until further notice.

This Class Action is Closed

This class action is closed.